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New year’s resolution – make protection a habit

There are certain things we do in life without thinking about them very much at all. Some of those things are good for us and some aren’t so good. It’s at this time of year that many people make a resolution to break out of some of those bad habits. Things like giving up smoking, […]

7 February 2014


New year’s resolution – make protection a habit

There are certain things we do in life without thinking about them very much at all. Some of those things are good for us and some aren’t so good. It’s at this time of year that many people make a resolution to break out of some of those bad habits. Things like giving up smoking, eating less and drinking less are fairly common but often people fall back into familiar ways fairly quickly. After all these things are habitual so it’s easy to lapse without even realising until it’s too late. What is more difficult is to form the new habits that are designed to replace the old ones that weren’t so good for us.

Unfortunately the same is true for protection. The UK public have, in general, never formed a habit of taking out protection as the cornerstone of their financial planning. Consequently it’s not something that most people do as a matter of course. To change this we need to make buying protection a habit, the norm, something people do without thinking. But the buying public won’t do this unless those they seek advice from make a habit of talking about it to them.

Often it is only considered when taking advice on another financial decision such as taking out a mortgage. And even then it is more often than not a secondary consideration and something that can be done later when they have more time to think about it and get round to it. But once the mortgage is arranged and the new home moved into, it’s only human nature that other things become more important and the need for protection is put on the back burner to be done another day. And this is not just clients that are deciding to delay the purchase. I’ve had several conversations recently with advisers who have said that following the upturn in the housing market they are too busy arranging mortgages to spend time arranging protection for their clients. They either won’t mention it at all or will decide they’ll come back to it at some point in the future. But this approach isn’t going to instil any urgency from the client if they ever do revisit the subject.

If it wasn’t important enough when taking out the mortgage last year, why would the client think it would be important now? It is important to strike whilst the iron is hot and while there’s a clear focus. The problem is that by not doing it straight away it often never gets done. Some advisers are therefore missing the easiest of opportunities to start building for their client the habit of having protection in place. And with the number of first time buyers, who are the least likely to have any form of protection already, increasing significantly, the opportunity hasn’t been so good for many years. But far too many families that have struggled to get on the housing ladder now run the risk of getting into financial difficulties when illness or death strikes unexpectedly, which could so easily be avoided with appropriate protection.

But we have to make sure that the new habits are good for us and aren’t just storing up another problem for us further down the line. Giving up smoking is a good thing, but if you replace the habit of having a cigarette with eating more, making you put on weight, you won’t get the full health benefit of your change in lifestyle. In terms of protection that would be like selling life cover to everyone. They’ve got some cover, which is good to a degree, but not necessarily the right cover. So it’s not just the big illnesses like cancer, heart attack and stroke that we need to point out the risks of. Many people, especially first time buyers, stretch their finances almost to breaking point when buying a home and initially have very little if anything in the way of savings left to fall back on should illness strike. A few months off work with a broken leg or bad back, perhaps on a reduced income, can see people quickly falling into arrears. It’s at times like this that much undersold products such as income protection really come into their own. Income protection addresses a risk that almost everyone is more likely to have to face during their working life, than they are to suffer a critical illness or die, yet is one of the least sold products. As the most likely risk to materialise it really should be the first that is protected against.

Yet the habit that many advisers have when they do mention protection in connection with a mortgage is to talk about the need to make sure the mortgage is paid off if you die or suffer a critical illness. Consequently the cover the public habitually buy when taking out a mortgage is life and critical illness cover. Comparatively few people would receive a recommendation for and therefore buy income protection. Partly because they don’t know it is available, but also partly because its reputation has been tarnished by similar products which to the untrained eye look the same. This is particularly so after the scandal caused by inappropriate payment protection insurance sales. What made matters even worse is that the industry added to the confusion by calling two very different products by the same name. This is one habit that it is imperative to kick and definitely one that should never be allowed to return.

I would never suggest that income protection should be compulsory. Whether it is appropriate is down to individual circumstances. For example people on a low income with little in the way of savings could just be replacing any state benefit they are entitled to as their income protection will be taken into account in the assessment of means tested benefits. Although someone on a middle income with a small amount of savings may also be replacing those means tested benefits, they would still be better off with income protection if this would replace a higher proportion of their total income than their state benefits would provide. But those on a higher income, whether they have savings or not, will definitely be better off taking out income protection – because the drop in income they would suffer if relying on the state alone would be the most significant. For middle and high income individuals income protection really should be much further up the list of priorities than it currently seems to be.

2013 saw several new products being launched and existing products changed to offer the preferred own occupation definition of incapacity to more people. In a bid to make it more affordable there is also a growing trend to offer plans that only pay for a limited period of one or two years rather than throughout the term of the policy. We’ve also seen claims statistics being published by most of the main providers for the first time and the ABI is still working on agreeing a consistent standard on how these statistics should be calculated. Once this is done it can only be a good thing and should help advisers change the perception that the general public hold, that most protection plans never pay out.

I have no doubt that providers will continue to innovate on income protection in 2014. Providers are trying to generate interest in the product by reinvigorating it to fit modern lifestyles. But we need to do more, particularly around the application process to make it as easy as possible for both client and adviser and the claims process to avoid any nasty surprises from claims being declined or benefits being reduced unexpectedly.
The buying public will only ever become more interested in income protection, if advisers make a habit of talking about it to clients. Perhaps 2014 will be the year that they start to do this.

photo credit: Mike Haufe via photopin cc

Roger Edwards 7 February 2014

Could Help to Buy help your protection business?

Ian Smart, Head of Product Development and Technical Support at Bright Grey, talks about Help to Buy and how it’s likely to affect the protection market.

20 January 2014


Could Help to Buy help your protection business?

Earlier this month prime minister David Cameron announced that in the first 3 months of the Help to Buy mortgage guarantee scheme, over 6,000 people put in offers on a home and applied for a mortgage. The mortgages, once approved, would represent nearly £1 billion of new lending to aspiring home owners who may have found the property market out of their reach before because of the size of deposit they needed. The figures also show that:

  • An additional 20,000 households have also been supported by the Help to Buy equity loan scheme. This is a separate scheme where the government provides an interest-free loan to support people buying new builds.
  • On average, households are looking to buy homes worth £160,000, which is below the UK average house price of £247,000.
  • They will face average monthly repayments of around £900 and have an annual household income of around £45,000. This means a Help to Buy mortgage represents 23% of borrowers’ gross income.
  • Over 80% are first-time buyers.

The large number of applications for Help to Buy mortgages suggests the high loan-to-value part of the mortgage market is moving once again. High loan-to-value mortgages have been the main route to ownership for most first-time buyers over the last 30 years, but there have been fewer products available in recent years.

While this is good news for both the mortgage market and the economic recovery in general, it’s disappointing that this doesn’t seem to be reflected in growing protection sales.  It’s even more concerning given the high proportion of first-time buyers who are likely to be the ones that are stretching their finances the furthest to get on the property ladder.

As an industry we need to make buying protection a habit.  But we’ll only do that if advisers make a habit of talking to their clients about the need for protection. And unless they do, they’re potentially missing one of the best opportunities for many years to persuade people it’s worth putting protection in place alongside what’s likely to be their biggest financial commitment. But we know that the protection sale will always be secondary to arranging the mortgage, so it needs to be as quick and painless as possible.

Given the high numbers of first-time buyers, it’s likely that the majority of Help to Buy clients will be at the younger end of the market. This means they’re less likely to have any significant medical history. So their applications can usually be completed online in less than 30 minutes. And more often than not, an immediate decision can be given so the policy can start as soon as the mortgage completes. For these people a simple product such as Bright Grey’s Lifestyle Plus protection plan may be the most appropriate, allowing them to make sure their mortgage is repaid should they die or suffer a critical illness. For someone looking for more comprehensive cover, you could consider Bright Grey’s Personal Protection Menu which would allow you to also add some income protection into the mix.

So with the start of a new year, why not make it your resolution to talk to your Help to Buy clients about protection and start making it a habit for both you and them?

For more information about Bright Grey’s Lifestyle Plus for first-time buyers, visit www.brightadviser.co.uk/personal/mortgage-street/ Or for more information about our Personal Protection Menu, visit www.brightadviser.co.uk/personal/covers

Over to you:  How is Help to Buy helping your protection business? Please leave a comment on the blog below.

photo credit: Images_of_Money via photopin cc

Roger Edwards 20 January 2014

“Probably the best critical illness sales aid I have ever seen in my life”

I recently had one of those days that made me feel glad to be me. As marketing development manager for Bright Grey, my days are varied and interesting but often hectic to the point of madness.

19 November 2013


“Probably the best critical illness sales aid I have ever seen in my life”

I recently had one of those days that made me feel glad to be me. As marketing development manager for Bright Grey, my days are varied and interesting but often hectic to the point of madness. And sometimes, there just isn’t time to even look up from my desk!

But, I’ve had time to reflect on our most recent campaign – prompted by a string of comments from advisers and others including a senior business development manager from one of the major nationals – all  of whom had emailed, called or popped by in person to tell me how much they liked our latest sales tool.  The pick of the bunch from advisers were “Probably the best CIC sales aid I have ever seen in my life”, and “Without doubt the single best protection sales aid I have seen in years”.

Protection is not a ‘one size fits all’ sale. It depends on so many contributing factors that it can be hard to present them all clearly.  Our new tool helps advisers to do that, and do it in a way that makes the message to the client a simple one to communicate.  That’s why a sales tool that presents the facts and statistics around critical illnesses in an engaging and personalised format has made such an impact.

It’s brilliant that the work we’re doing is recognised and appreciated by our audience, our sales people and the advisers who sell our products. But it did raise some questions about what our recently announced change of brand would mean for our marketing material.

One adviser bemoaned the future passing of the Bright Grey brand by saying “Absolutely crazy…it was different, it was pink, nice mints”. Mints aside, what won’t change, magenta, blue or sky-blue pink with dots on, is the content of our marketing material.

We’ll still have the same team of protection experts inputting to our content, and the same skilled and passionate marketeers taking that content and turning it into the sort of output that earns accolades like those above.

Our aim, as a marketing team, is to inform, educate, support and engage through our content.  To make the selling of our products as easy a task as it can be, to present the information as clearly and plainly as possible, but without being so dull it makes you want to eat cardboard for light relief… To make our products the ones that advisers want to sell and consumers want to buy.

Do we achieve that?  Well the stars need to be aligned.  There has to be a quality product behind the glitter, and a strong proposition underpinned by excellent service of course. But from a marketing perspective, whether our stick-men and magenta colours are to your taste or not, the sales ideas and tools are sound.  They work. And I know that because our advisers tell us so. So at the end of the day, it’s what we say and do that’s a measure of our strengths, not what colour our logo is. And although one day we won’t be the pinkest, or the mintiest, we’ll still be the rinki-dinkiest and we’ll still strive to give our audience the best sales aids they’ve ever seen in their lives.

If you haven’t yet seen our new critical illness sales aid, why not have a look here right now.

photo credit: publicenergy via photopin cc

Over to you:  Please leave a comment on the blog below.

 

 

Roger Edwards 19 November 2013

What a single brand strategy really means for protection advisers

‘What used to be a Marathon is now a Snicker. It’s still a peanut filled chocolate bar’ was how one adviser summed up last week’s announcement that the protection businesses of Bright Grey and Scottish Provident would be replaced in 2015 by a single Royal London brand.

5 November 2013


What a single brand strategy really means for protection advisers

‘What used to be a Marathon is now a Snicker.  It’s still a peanut filled chocolate bar’ was how one adviser summed up the recent announcement that the protection businesses of Bright Grey and Scottish Provident would be replaced in 2015 by a single Royal London brand.

While the contours of the protection landscape will alter as a result of this, it’s worth observing that change has been ever present in our industry and I’d like to think that those changes in the main have meant progress.  And that means we now have a stronger and more robust market, which in turn has created a greater degree of customer confidence in protection products.

So, while the intention to operate under a single brand across the UK pension, protection and asset management businesses has been signalled, the move is being staged at a sensible pace to allow acclimatisation to the new brand, without destroying the goodwill we’ve already fostered.

The benefits of operating a single brand may not initially seem clear to everyone, but by moving to a brand with some very serious ambitions means that we can all share the benefits of a stronger awareness – a distinct advantage when making a recommendation to a client – which in turn should result in increased sales and retention.

So, if we can continue the sentiment of the chocolate bar analogy, these exciting changes may mean a different name but the key ingredients remain the same.  It is very much a case of business as usual from us and our continuing commitment to supporting advisers leading up to the change and beyond.

And in terms of the decision by Mars to rebrand the Marathon bar to Snickers in Britain over 20 years ago, it was a decision that not only made commercial sense but brought success.  Snickers is the world’s best selling chocolate bar of all time – now that’s an appetising prospect.

Over to you: What other advantages will a prominent brand bring to you and your business? Please leave a comment below.

photo credit: jeff_golden via photopin cc

Roger Edwards 5 November 2013

How do we make sure critical illness cover remains relevant?

Jennifer Gilchrist, senior product development manager at Bright Grey, highlights the confusion surrounding terminology used in conjunction with a new critical illness trend.

8 October 2013


How do we make sure critical illness cover remains relevant?

If you asked protection industry experts to name the most significant current development in the critical illness field there would only be one result. Hogging the limelight has been a trend for the introduction of cover elements that pay out a lesser amount than the policy sum insured for conditions not actually defined as critical illnesses.

According to Defaqto, the number of policies providing these has now increased to 72% from only 14% at the end of 2009. The range of conditions covered has also increased from just 10 in May 2012 to 30 at present. But their greatest significance is undoubtedly for cancer – all early-stage forms of which cannot be defined as critical illnesses.

Intermediaries and industry experts would secure a high degree of agreement that this trend is welcome. After all, it seems only right that someone suffering from a highly emotive condition like early-stage breast cancer or testicular cancer should receive at least some form of pay-out, even though they don’t qualify for the full sum insured.

Nevertheless, there is far less unanimity amongst insurers and industry experts when it comes to agreeing on the terminology used in conjunction with these lesser payments. Most in the industry use a blanket term to refer to them all as ‘partial payments’, which by my reckoning is inaccurate.

It is important to differentiate the approaches that can be taken by insurers.  The first approach would be to reduce the overall policy sum insured if the pay out for one of the lesser amounts was made. It is only in this situation that the term ‘partial payment’ should really be used, because if the sum insured is not reduced then a ‘partial’ amount of it will never be paid out.

When lesser pay-outs are made but the sum insured remains unchanged, the cover element should instead be referred to as an ‘additional condition’ and some insurers are already using this.  However, there needs to be consistency across the market. And perhaps the only way to make this happen is to involve the Association of British Insurers (ABI) by asking them to clarify definitions of these terms when the next Statement of Best Practice is due.

Additionally, although understood by insurers and industry experts, it is important for intermediaries who don’t deal so regularly in critical illness cover to realise that the wordings of partial payments and additional conditions can vary markedly between products and insurers.

Pay-outs for the same conditions can easily range from the lower of 12.5% of the sum insured or £12,500 to the lower of 25% or £25,000. Insurers can also differ widely on the extent of the evidence or treatment required for a policyholder to qualify for a pay-out.

Terms can vary in this respect even on additional conditions included on the same policy. For example, this month Bright Grey increased the number of its additional conditions to seven by adding three new covers for low-incidence carcinomas in situ – not cancers in their own right but abnormal cells or cells that have started to turn into cancers and, if left untreated, could become invasive.

All three pay out the lower of 20% of the sum insured or £15,000 but, whereas the covers for carcinoma in situ of the testicle and of the oesophagus will only pay out for surgery, the cover for carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder will pay out on a definite diagnosis supported by histological evidence.

Clearly this trend has not made the task of comparing critical illness policies any easier for advisers. But this will, hopefully, be more than compensated for by the fact that it has made the product more valuable to consumers in meeting their needs and will cut down on disappointment at the claims stage.

Over to you: Do you agree that the term ‘partial payment’ is misleading and inaccurate in the world of critical illness cover? Please leave a comment below.

photo credit: WingedWolf via photopin cc

A version of this article was published in Health Insurance

Roger Edwards 8 October 2013

How to get across the benefits of relevant life plans in 3½ minutes

It’s easy to describe relevant life plans as an alternative way for employers to provide death in service benefits to their employees, but is it easy to remember all the complex details around tax? Watch our short video to find out more.

29 August 2013


How to get across the benefits of relevant life plans in 3½ minutes

It’s easy to describe relevant life plans as an alternative way for employers to provide death in service benefits to their employees, but is it easy to remember all the complex details around tax?

Well, now you can either watch our short animated film to refresh your memory or use it as an attention grabbing sales tool to help support your recommendation to your clients.

It’s a concise way to engage with company directors and help demonstrate the benefits of relevant life plans. You can either email it to your professional connections for them to watch in their own time or embed it on your website, or why not do both.

Over to you: Please let us know what you think of the video by leaving a comment below.

Roger Edwards 29 August 2013

Missing – 12 million financial safety nets

Naturally, as a protection provider, we understand the significance of having a contingency plan. However, this isn’t mirrored across Britain with three out of five (60%) of the adult population admitting to not having any financial protection in place should the worst happen. A financial safety net is a vital concept but one that isn’t […]

16 August 2013


Missing – 12 million financial safety nets

Naturally, as a protection provider, we understand the significance of having a contingency plan. However, this isn’t mirrored across Britain with three out of five (60%) of the adult population admitting to not having any financial protection in place should the worst happen. A financial safety net is a vital concept but one that isn’t registering with a significant number of people.

To encourage people to take action to protect their finances, it is essential that we all play our part in getting the message out and making protection a priority. Bright Grey’s Financial Safety Net Report has just revealed that many people may be overestimating how much a life or critical illness policy would set them back, as almost half (43%) of respondents said that the cost of cover is too great an expense to bear. In reality, with premiums costing as little as £5 a month, a financial safety net to help prevent financial disasters doesn’t need to be prohibitive.

This is especially true if you look at it alongside other monthly outgoings, for instance over one in ten of Britons admitted to spending £17 on pets, £7 on chocolate and £28 on digital television every month.

Through our financial safety net campaign we want to highlight the potential consequences of not planning ahead and stressing the importance of a financial safety net if an unexpected tragedy occurred.

Nearly a quarter of people accept that they would have to drastically reduce their living costs in order to survive, in the event that the main breadwinner was diagnosed with a serious illness, suffered a disability or died. This, more than anything, demonstrates its importance in helping to maintain an everyday standard of living.

Once the family’s financial safety net is in place, they can then turn their attention to other priorities and aspirations in the knowledge that they are protected whatever happens.

Over to you: Are you surprised by the findings? Please let us know your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

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Roger Edwards 16 August 2013

Be relevant and beat the competition

Being a life insurance broker is not the most glamorous of jobs I admit. But having not quite made it as a rock star my plan B has slowly become plan A and headlining Glastonbury seems to be getting slightly further from my grasp.

26 July 2013


Be relevant and beat the competition

By guest blogger Jody Pearmain, director of My Protect Ltd and MyKeyManInsurance.com

Being a life insurance broker is not the most glamorous of jobs I admit. But having not quite made it as a rock star my plan B has slowly become plan A and headlining Glastonbury seems to be getting slightly further from my grasp. I’ve worked at a few different companies as a protection advisor and now as owner of my own company it’s more important than ever to indulge myself more and more into the world of life insurance.

Historically our company is very geared to the online market as this is my area of expertise. But it’s becoming more and more difficult to compete with the likes of MoneySupermarket and comparethemarket.com, while even ASDA and Tesco are getting in on the act with first page Google results of  keyword “life insurance”. With companies and brokers giving away commission and preferential rates being offered directly from some of the brands, competition is very strong.  As a smaller brokerage we have to look at ways to offer added value to our customers by giving them more tailored solutions while also giving them a competitive price. But when it comes to straight forward life insurance it’s mainly all about price. You are either dead or alive; nobody pays out if you are half dead or less dead. Apart from a few minor differences, the basic gist is that you get a lump sum on death. So while we can talk about brands being better than others and differences in the suicide attributes, most clients (in my experience) want the best deal. Which is normally always the cheapest.

Relevant Life Insurance to the rescue

Relevant Life is still a relatively new product and it seems to be taking a long time for people and especially the big brand brokers to get involved. So while they play catch up, brokers should really make hay and speak to as many clients as possible regarding relevant life. Accountants are a great source of leads as they are all about saving money. But you will also find that your existing client bank may be full of people ready to put their life insurance on expenses.

Relevant life insurance can save higher rate tax payers up to 49% on their premiums and for basic rate tax payers you could reduce their premiums by up to 40%. This means no problems with competing with the big brands. They will never get anywhere close to these discounts! Even if the gross premiums are higher than their current policy, savings can be made. This means even clients with 4/5 year old policies can still possibly benefit. Along with the money saving benefits there are possible tax savings with the policy being placed in a trust. Owners of companies and employees of small business are the main target market which is hugely untapped. So we small brokers can compete and relevant life insurance gives us some really juicy selling points and really something to shout about. We are saving clients’ money and giving them good advice at the same time which is fair isn’t it?

So if you are not already speaking about relevant life then get involved and start today.

The thoughts and opinions in the guest blogs belong to the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Bright Grey or Scottish Provident.

MyKeyManInsurance.com is a trading style of My Protect Limited for website purposes only. My Protect Limited is an Appointed Representative of Personal Touch Financial Services Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.  See more about relevant life here - http://www.mykeymaninsurance.com/relevant-life-policy/ You can contact Jody at G+

To find out more about relevant life policies from Bright Grey click here

Over to you: Please let us know your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

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Roger Edwards 26 July 2013

Legislative change in the protection industry – opportunity or threat?

There has been a lot of change in financial services legislation lately and it’s always easy to focus on the negative aspects of that change.  Yes, it’s true some of the change has made life more difficult for providers, advisers and customers alike. But not all legislative change is bad news and occasionally a new […]

10 July 2013


Legislative change in the protection industry – opportunity or threat?

There has been a lot of change in financial services legislation lately and it’s always easy to focus on the negative aspects of that change.  Yes, it’s true some of the change has made life more difficult for providers, advisers and customers alike. But not all legislative change is bad news and occasionally a new opportunity comes along.  It’s just a question of whether anyone spots the opportunity to open up new markets or ways of doing things and how they react to it.

One example is relevant life policies (RLP). An RLP is a stand-alone single life policy and offers an alternative way for employers to give death-in-service benefits to their employees outside of a registered group life scheme. These became available because of changes in legislation.  I’m not aware of any lobbying from the industry to allow life cover to be written in this way. If there had been I’m sure it wouldn’t have taken so long for them to emerge and the market to develop. So it’s encouraging that the legislators deemed it appropriate to allow such policies and the generous tax treatment they receive.  Yet it was more than 3 years after the change in legislation that the first provider Bright Grey spotted the opportunity and felt comfortable enough to launch its first product to meet the requirement of the legislation.  And almost 5 years later we are still seeing some providers entering the market for the first time and some not entering it at all.

When we first thought relevant life policies may be possible we naturally asked ourselves the question, why has nobody else already done this? If it is really as simple as we think surely someone must have looked at it already and decided that it wasn’t viable.  But the more we thought about it the more we soon realised that this was a significant opportunity that was of benefit to our customers and too good to keep to ourselves. Someone had to be first, so why not make that Bright Grey?

With the success that the early entrants have had in this market it is something of a surprise that some providers have taken so long to recognise the opportunity relevant life policies represent. Perhaps this is a reaction to past experience with things like pension term. Having had their fingers burnt once by HM Treasury, first ignoring the industry’s warning of the effects of the legislation as drafted and then quickly changing the legislation once the predictions came true, it is understandable.  Perhaps they have simply been too busy with other things such as the seemingly endless game of top trumps with the number of critical illness definitions that can be added.

But one thing is for sure.  None of us can afford to rest on our laurels, or the world will pass us by.  It is essential for providers and advisers to keep up to date with legislative change to spot the positive as well as the negative.

To find out more about RLPs visit the Bright Grey relevant life policy page

Over to you: Please let us know your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

photo credit: “Caveman Chuck” Coker via photopin cc

Roger Edwards 10 July 2013

New blog for Uncovered coming soon…

Sorry we’ve been a little quiet since our last blog post. Since then the business has been going through some changes and restructuring to enable us to continue to deliver strong expertise with greater efficiency. And as most of you will know, Roger Edwards, the face of Uncovered since its launch in 2009, decided not […]

8 July 2013


New blog for Uncovered coming soon…

Sorry we’ve been a little quiet since our last blog post. Since then the business has been going through some changes and restructuring to enable us to continue to deliver strong expertise with greater efficiency. And as most of you will know, Roger Edwards, the face of Uncovered since its launch in 2009, decided not to be considered for a role in the new structure and left the company last week.

However, the good news is we will continue to bring you news, opinions and thoughts from across the protection industry and will be building on the excellent Uncovered foundations Roger helped to create.

There’s a new blog coming soon – we look forward to hearing your feedback.

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Roger Edwards 8 July 2013


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